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Ebook information for faculty  

Last Updated: Jun 11, 2015 URL: http://libguides.gallaudet.edu/content.php?pid=673866 Print Guide RSS Updates
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Introduction

This page is designed to give Gallaudet University faculty basic information about the Library’s electronic book collections (ebooks).  For details on how to access, download, and print from electronic books, please see How do I use ebooks.

The Library devotes the majority of its General (not-Deaf-related) book budget to ebooks.  In FY2014, it spent

  • 60% ($18,900) on ebooks
  • 40% ($13,100) on print.  

The percentage of funds spent on ebooks is expected to be even higher in FY2015.

Ebooks are relatively new in the publishing world, and they are still evolving.   They’re provided

  • by a variety of vendors
  • on a variety of platforms
  • in a variety of formats.  

Some books have no limits on the number of users or how much can be accessed.  Other books have very strict limits.   

When you are preparing for a course, we recommend that you email your syllabus to library.reserves@gallaudet.edu.  The Library can check on the accessibility of the ebooks (and other readings) you’d like to use, and if appropriate provide you with links to post on Blackboard.  Information from you will also help the Library plan for expenditures.

 

 

Kinds of ebook access

The Library has access to ebook collections from several vendors.   There are three kinds of collections:

1. Unlimited access provided through the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC).  When you look at the Library’s catalog information, you will see “Available to All WRLC Patrons.”  Example:

 There is no limit on how much of a book can be read online, how long a person may read it, or the number of simultaneous users.  There are varying limits on how much can be downloaded, copied, or printed.  Access to individual titles may vary from year to year.

 

2.  Unlimited access purchased by Gallaudet University Library.  When you look at the Library’s catalog information, you will see “Access restricted to current Gallaudet University members -- Login required.”  Example:  

 A librarian may have purchased the book because of anticipated demand, or its purchase may have been triggered by the number of uses described below in #3.  There is no limit on how much of the book can be read online.  There may be limits on how long a person may read it, or the number of simultaneous users.  There are varying limits on how much can be downloaded, copied, or printed.  


3. Pay-per-use (also called “demand driven acquisition” and “patron driven acquisition”).  When you look at the Library’s catalog information, you will see “Access restricted to current Gallaudet University members -- Login required.”  Example:  

Yes, this is exactly the same information you see in #2, “Unlimited access purchased by Gallaudet University Library,” but access is very different.  A user can read a book online for five minutes.  After that, he must “borrow” it to continue using it.  Each time a book is “borrowed,” the Library pays a percentage of its full price.  After a certain number of uses, it is automatically purchased for the full price.   There are varying limits on how much can be downloaded, copied, or printed.  Access to individual titles may vary from year to year.

 

 

 

Impact on faculty and students

As you see, it can be impossible to know an ebook’s accessibility from the catalog.  Don’t assign a reading your students won’t be able to access!

 When you are preparing for a course, email your syllabus to
    library.reserves@gallaudet.edu.  

The Library will

  • check on the accessibility of the ebooks (and other readings) you’d like to use
  • if appropriate provide you with links to post on Blackboard.  

Information from you will also help the Library plan for expenditures.

Working with ebooks can be very challenging for students.  Before you assign readings, please help your students and the Library by asking us to check their accessibility.

 And of course, please let us know any time you or your students have trouble accessing any of our electronic resources.

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